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Caring Senior Service of San Antonio

Caring Senior Service of San Antonio Blog

Providing senior in-home care tips and stories for everything related to senior care.

3 Ways to Deal With Wandering

Posted by Ruby Cemental on Sep 26, 2017 5:30:00 PM

Senior_wandering-LR.jpgMost appeal who suffer from Alzheimer's Disease and other forms of dementia will wander. This can be dangerous for seniors for many reasons, and managing this behavior is a must for all caregivers. Here are three ways to help manage it.

Give Dementia Patients No Need to Wander

One of the best ways to prevent this behavior is to make sure that the senior's needs are met so that she has no need to wander. Ask regularly whether she needs to go to the bathroom, is thirsty, would like something to eat, etc. If she is losing some of her communications skills, take her to the bathroom regularly to see whether she will use it and leave a glass of water nearby her during the day. 

Know When a Door or Window Is Opened

When a senior gets out of the home, or even out of the room, depending on the dementia severity, the caregiver should know immediately. If a senior tends to wander, alarming the doors and windows will allow you to know quickly when she is on the move. This can be a full alarm system, a stick-on system that isn't wired or even just a bell wrapped around the doorknobs. 

Keep Things Calm and Prevent Overstimulation

When a senior is kept calm and not introduced to a hectic environment, he may be less inclined to wander. When in a crowd or around loud sounds, he may not understand what is going on or where he is. It's best to stay away from crowds and other situations that might be overstimulating and lead to wandering. 

At Caring Senior Service, our expert staff is comprised of extremely knowledgeable, friendly, and trusted professionals who take pride in helping your loved one manage their daily activities. Contact us today to learn more!

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Topics: Dementia and Alzheimer’s